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What is Sensory Integration?

According to Dr. A. Jean Ayres who first developed the theory for sensory integraton,

"Sensory integration theory proposes that sensory integration is a neurobiological process that organizes sensation from one's own body and from the environment and makes it possible to use the body effectively within the environment."


Sensory Integration is the brain's ability to perceive and respond to the senses that the body experiences. The senses include the five typical senses: taste, touch, smell, hearing, and sight; it also includes proprioceptive and vestibular senses.

Proprioceptive sense deals with our muscles, tendons, and joints. Through the body's muscles, tendons, and joints the body is able to establish its position and the amount of force on the muscles and joints. Vestibular sense deals with the gravitational pull on the body and the way the body responds to it with balance, bilateral coordination, and the body's speed and movement. Sensory integration is a developmental process that includes the child and their interaction in the environment.



When a child experiences problems with sensory integration it can manifest in problems such as reading, writing, organizational skills, learning skills, and attention.

Because there is such a variety in sensory integration dysfunction, therapy differs from child to child. Therapy can include sensory desenitization activities, for sensory seeking, visual processing, auditory processing, vestibular processing, and emotional and social response.


For a complete Sensory Integration Praxis Test (SIPT) call

870.932.5551




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Expert From:

"Sensory Integration: Answers for Parents", Pediatric Therapy Network, Copyright 2004